Venice and Croatia in the winter

Fifty Years of Backpacking, and still going at it. Why travel South East Europe in the winter? The Pluses: 1. short lines, or none at all 2. Cheap air flights 3. Rooms readily available at great discounts 4. Museum entrance tickets available in all cases The Minus(es) 1. Cold rain, at times. Some of it persistent and unpleasant. Susan had three weeks of ‘use-it-or-lose-it’ vacation. So we would use it. And where to? Susan said that anyplace would be fine, since she basically had not traveled in her life. I had been to Italy a few times. But I had never gotten up to Venice. It was on my bucket list of places to visit. So we booked round-trip tickets flying from Indianapolis to Venice, and returning from Istanbul to Indianapolis. At $930 @ ticket, we got tickets at half their summer rate. So we were off to the races.   Venice was the only city we made reservations for. We readily found rooms wherever else we went, without difficulty. I began traveling internationally with backpacks in 1964. I have not felt a major reason to change. And so, here I am, on my fiftieth year of backpacking. We are traveling light. We carry all our luggage above. We have settled on three changes of clothes, and we hand-wash our clothes every night in our room. This will work for us. two-backpacks So I have my day pack here, which snaps to my ultralight backpack. This gives me both balance and accessibility. So Susan and I set in on Venice on February first, 2014, hoping that winter would be gone when we returned three weeks later. On that one point, we were really going to be disappointed. venice-sue-and-gondola San Marcos Plaza and the four museums around that plaza are must-sees. This city is going under water, slowly. Already, many of the first stories of the buildings are abandoned as their foundations settle into the the sand and the sea rises. But Venice will grace us with its beauty for a century or two more before it finally succumbs to its watery ruins. On to Croatia via train and bus. With the breakup of the old Yugoslavia, there are now lots of smaller Balkan countries. We head out for Split, Croatia. (or , We split for Split?)

Diocletian’s Palace at night.dio-castle-night   dio-dw-gates Diocletian’s Palace is a joy to behold. Built 1800 years ago directly on the Adriatic Coast and now occupying about four city blocks, it stands in near-perfect condition. Hundreds of businesses thrive within its walls, and thousands of people permanently live there. These cool marble walkways have seen millions of feet from legions of conquering foes. But the walls stand on.

South from Split, we went to the great walled city of Dubrovnik. This is the most perfectly preserved walled, medieval city in the world. It is truly a wonder to behold.
du-susan1 du-wall-dw

du-outside-nightDubrovnik at night

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About the Author

Dwight Worker is an American professor, activist, adventurer, and fugitive. He escaped from the Mexican penitentiary Palacio de Lecumberri in 1975 along with the book and movie Escape about the story

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Worker is a former professor at Indiana University, where he created the Information Security program for the Kelley School of Business before retiring in 2008 to farm, write, and travel.….READ MORE